The History of the Nile basin

The History of the Nile basin

Humanity was born in Africa; all people, ultimately are Africans

“Humanity was born in Africa; all people, ultimately are Africans”;  a phrase one can find in the Apartheid Museum in Johannesburg, South Africa, that expresses in the simplest way the universal identity of Africa and the rootedness of humanity in the motherland.

Referring to Africa as ‘the motherland’ (or fatherland) has its roots in many ancient civilizations that this continent nurtured. The Do(h)gon, a culture that thrived in the rocky hills of Eastern Mali, trace back their origins to the Nile basin. They defined their identity as Afrakans connected to Afraka meaning “the first sun soul”.

 

Humanity was born in Africa; all people, ultimately are Africans

Ancient Egyptians called their land ‘Afru-Ika’ meaning ‘the mother of the universe’, a phrase used until this day by many Egyptians. Similarly, according to Kemetic history, the name ‘Alkebu Lan’ is used to designate the area of current-day Ethiopia and Sudan, which signifies “mother of humankind” and also “Garden of Eden”.

Ancient Egyptians called their land ‘Afru-Ika’ meaning ‘the mother of the universe’, a phrase used until this day by many Egyptians. Similarly, according to Kemetic history, the name ‘Alkebu Lan’ is used to designate the area of current-day Ethiopia and Sudan, which signifies “mother of humankind” and also “Garden of Eden”.

Among the different theories of the origins of humankind, there is a large consensus among scientific communities that Africa is “the cradle of humankind” because it is the only continent with fossil evidence of Homo sapiens and their ancestors through each key stage of their evolution. It is widely agreed that the Nile basin was the cradle of our human history. The famous fossilized bone skeleton of ‘Lucy’, an early Australopithecus dating back to 3.2 million years ago, discovered in 1974, in Hadar in the Awash Valley of Ethiopia, testifies to the birth of humanity in Africa and particularly around the Nile riparian countries. Lucy’s legacy revealed the hidden treasures of Ethiopia and the region to paleontologists; further excavations and discoveries continued around the Nile providing further evidence of the Homo erectus migration routes to the rest of the world.

Among the different theories of the origins of humankind, there is a large consensus among scientific communities that Africa is “the cradle of humankind” because it is the only continent with fossil evidence of Homo sapiens and their ancestors through each key stage of their evolution. It is widely agreed that the Nile basin was the cradle of our human history. The famous fossilized bone skeleton of ‘Lucy’, an early Australopithecus dating back to 3.2 million years ago, discovered in 1974, in Hadar in the Awash Valley of Ethiopia, testifies to the birth of humanity in Africa and particularly around the Nile riparian countries. Lucy’s legacy revealed the hidden treasures of Ethiopia and the region to paleontologists; further excavations and discoveries continued around the Nile providing further evidence of the Homo erectus migration routes to the rest of the world.

This human movement along the Nile, played an instrumental role in the cultural landscape of Africa and the world. As people moved, they enhanced their skills in developing tools to support their hunting and gathering activities. The interaction with unique ecosystems allowed the development of these tools and sharpened their skills in community building, which shifted the pattern of migration to settling societies that were the foundation of civilizations we know; Kemetic, Axumite, Kushite, Merowe among others. The Nile River bears witness to the remains of these historical eras and these monuments - the Giza pyramids, the Merowe pyramids, and the Axumite obelisks, to name but a few - stand as landmarks in the history of humanity to this very day.  Indeed, the excellence of our ancestors contributed to major contemporary disciplines; philosophy, chemistry, hydrology, agriculture, and architecture. Similarly, all monotheistic religions find their roots in the Nile basin; Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Today Islam is the predominant religion in Egypt and Sudan and Christianity in Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, and South Sudan. However, Islam might have never flourished as it did without Ethiopia and similarly Christianity might have not found the space to grow without Egypt.

This human movement along the Nile, played an instrumental role in the cultural landscape of Africa and the world. As people moved, they enhanced their skills in developing tools to support their hunting and gathering activities. The interaction with unique ecosystems allowed the development of these tools and sharpened their skills in community building, which shifted the pattern of migration to settling societies that were the foundation of civilizations we know; Kemetic, Axumite, Kushite, Merowe among others. The Nile River bears witness to the remains of these historical eras and these monuments - the Giza pyramids, the Merowe pyramids, and the Axumite obelisks, to name but a few - stand as landmarks in the history of humanity to this very day.  Indeed, the excellence of our ancestors contributed to major contemporary disciplines; philosophy, chemistry, hydrology, agriculture, and architecture.  Similarly, all monotheistic religions find their roots in the Nile basin; Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Today Islam is the predominant religion in Egypt and Sudan and Christianity in Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, and South Sudan. However, Islam might have never flourished as it did without Ethiopia and similarly Christianity might have not found the space to grow without Egypt.

This human movement along the Nile, played an instrumental role in the cultural landscape of Africa and the world. As people moved, they enhanced their skills in developing tools to support their hunting and gathering activities. The interaction with unique ecosystems allowed the development of these tools and sharpened their skills in community building, which shifted the pattern of migration to settling societies that were the foundation of civilizations we know; Kemetic, Axumite, Kushite, Merowe among others. The Nile River bears witness to the remains of these historical eras and these monuments - the Giza pyramids, the Merowe pyramids, and the Axumite obelisks, to name but a few - stand as landmarks in the history of humanity to this very day.  Indeed, the excellence of our ancestors contributed to major contemporary disciplines; philosophy, chemistry, hydrology, agriculture, and architecture. Similarly, all monotheistic religions find their roots in the Nile basin; Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Today Islam is the predominant religion in Egypt and Sudan and Christianity in Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, and South Sudan. However, Islam might have never flourished as it did without Ethiopia and similarly Christianity might have not found the space to grow without Egypt.

Eye
History

The Cosmos

Made in the interiors of collapsing stars tingling of the spine descended from astronomers hearts of the stars white dwarf Flatland. Courage of our questions trillion Sea of Tranquility a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam globular star cluster at the edge of forever.

History

Content